Author Archives: Mark Wilson

About Mark Wilson

Mark Wilson is a Professor of Geology at The College of Wooster. He specializes in invertebrate paleontology, carbonate sedimentology, and stratigraphy. He also is an expert on pseudoscience, especially creationism.

Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Remanié fossils in the Lower Cretaceous of south-central England

The last two editions were about a bryozoan and borings from the Faringdon Sponge Gravels (Lower Cretaceous, Upper Aptian) of south-central England. This week we have some Jurassic fossils from the same unit. That sounds a bit daft at first … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Abundant borings in Early Cretaceous cobbles from south-central England

Last week I described a cyclostome bryozoan on the outside of a quartz cobble from the Faringdon Sponge Gravels (Lower Cretaceous, Upper Aptian) of south-central England near the town of Faringdon. This week I’m featuring a variety of heavily-bored calcareous … Continue reading
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The power of hand-held x-ray fluorescence analysis comes to Wooster

WOOSTER, OHIO–Dr. Meagen Pollock, our mineralogist-petrologist and instrument scientist extraordinaire, should be writing this post, but she was off campus during this event. It is left to the paleontologist, of all people, to file this report. Despite my technological naïveté … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: An Early Cretaceous cobble-dwelling bryozoan

One of my formative experiences as a young paleontologist was working in the Faringdon Sponge Gravels (Lower Cretaceous, Upper Aptian) of south-central England while on my first research leave in 1985. (I was just a kid!) These gravels are extraordinarily … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: An Ordovician hardground with a bryozoan and borings — and an unexpected twist

The view above, one quite familiar to me, is of a carbonate hardground from the Upper Ordovician Grant Lake Formation exposed near Washington, Mason County, Kentucky. We are looking directly at the bedding plane of this limestone. The lumpy, spotted … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A faulted oyster ball from the Middle Jurassic of Utah

I’m returning this week to one of my favorite fossil types: the ostreolith, popularly known as the “oyster ball”. These were lovingly described in a previous blog entry, so please click there to see how they were formed and some … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Silicified productid brachiopods from the Permian of West Texas

The three beauties above are productid brachiopods from the Road Canyon Formation (Middle Permian, Roadian, approximately 270 million years old) in the Glass Mountains of southwestern Texas. They are part of a series we’ve done on the silicified fauna of … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Silicified chonetid brachiopods from the Permian of West Texas

Above are four valves of the chonetid brachiopod Dyoros planiextensus Cooper and Grant, 1975. They are preserved by silicification and were recovered from a block of the Road Canyon Formation (Roadian Stage of the Guadalupian Series of the Permian System) … Continue reading
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An unexpected early return from China, but at least I got to see the inside of a Chinese hospital

WOOSTER, OHIO — I am safely home far too early from my China adventure, and here begins a painful tale. I tell it first to complete the 2014 China Expedition story, and because there may be some lessons for geologists … Continue reading
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The karst topography around Guiyang, China

GUIYANG, CHINA — I find this karstic landscape enchanting. Photo taken at the airport. Continue reading

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