Category Archives: ScotBlogs Contributed

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: Predatory trace from the Upper Cretaceous of southwestern France

One hole in a shell is unremarkable. Several in a repeating pattern is a story. Above is a right valve (exterior) of the oyster Pycnodonte vesicularis from the Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) of southwestern France. It was collected during our fantastic … Continue reading
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Wildfires in Montana

Windy, warm, and dry is a good recipe for wildfires, and that has been the norm for Montana this year.  For example, from June 1 through September 4, Missoula received 2.07 inches of precipitation, less than half its average rainfall … Continue reading
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The annual Wooster Paleontology field trip to the Upper Ordovician (Fall 2017 version)

It’s not that I haven’t loved all my Invertebrate Paleontology classes, but the students this year are special because there are only ten of them. Lately I’ve had up to thirty students per class which is great for many reasons, … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossil of the Week: A rudist clam from the Upper Cretaceous of southwestern France

When we picked up this beautiful fossil in southwestern France this summer, Paul Taylor immediately predicted it would become a Wooster Fossil of the Week. Macy Conrad (’18), Paul and I were on our wonderful expedition in the Type Campanian … Continue reading
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The Cupola

There is a fantastic castle in the sky, built in free fall, brick-by-brick. It derives its energy from sunlight and recycles its water. Sealed against a vacuum, its inhabitants float and glide through its passageways as the sun rises and … Continue reading
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Unknown fossils for the Invertebrate Paleontology class at Wooster

I start my Invertebrate Paleontology classes with an unknown fossil given to each student. I pick something I have enough examples of so that everyone gets the same species. As their first assignment, the students are asked to identify their … Continue reading
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Jesse Davenport (’11) Returns to GeoClub

Wooster, OH – GeoClub met for the first time in the 2017-2018 academic year, allowing us to catch up with old friends and meet new ones. It was our good fortune to host a special guest, Jesse Davenport, a 2011 … Continue reading
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Wooster Geology Department 2017 Annual Report

The Thirty-First Annual Report of the Geology Department is now available online with this link. Our Administrative Coordinator Patrice Reeder has once again done a magnificent job putting this document together, with amazing attention to detail and an artistic eye … Continue reading
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Wooster’s Fossils of the Week: Oysters from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) of southwestern France

Wooster’s Fossil of the Week returns from its summer hiatus. It is appropriate, then, to feature as our first fossil of the new season an oyster species prominent in our summer research. This is Pycnodonte vesicularis (Lamarck, 1806), a very … Continue reading
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Museums in Time and Space

We visited many museums while in London and one of the most impressive was the Natural History Museum.  The original building was completed and opened to the public in 1881. The Darwin Centre in particular holds millions of preserved specimens, … Continue reading
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